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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 16, 2016 3:02am-4:30am EST

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>> when i showed her, like oh, mygod. >> how cool must it have been to grow up with ritchie as your dad. >> a legend. >> speaking of legends, we lost a beg one last month, david bowie, the61-year-old losing his long battle with cancer. >> and we're his superhoddal wife iman just a month ago. she showed no signs of her husband's secret struggles. >> your husband david bowie, you guys have been marri since '92. the love is soinspiring. how do you manage that? >> we have never had -- we understand the person and the personal. >> keeping a brave face and her husband's secret hidden tig we sat down with the woman who
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april as herr husband, an icon who changed music and culture was nine months into a cancer battle he tragically lost two days after his birthday. >> it's nothing we haven't or done for that matter. >> right. >> you're indulge in any form of worship? >> live. let's dance put on your red shoes and dance the blues >> it's almost easier to talk about the way that david bowie didn't change music, he combined music and fashion, music and theater. music and film. he did everything. our music insider "rolling stone" contributor joe levy says it's fearless trance sentence between music and art
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>> it's about being strange and different, and everybody that felt a little bit strange and a littl different. they were like thank you so much, i no longer feel like a complete space alien. >> i have always worked that kind of structure of juxtaposing elements of society putting them together to create this sort of mythical kind ofsociety. >> off you were madonna or kanye west, that matters >> both artists posted tribute messages. time may change me i can't change time >> ricky gervais said he lost a hero. >> oh, my god, unbelievable. >> the two bonded in when bowie appeared in ger
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resulted in a brilliantly funny musical performance. >> it was my sitcom. it was sold out. it's a difficult one. to keep the integrity after that first little fat man that sold his soul the little fat man who sold his dream >> something doing the extras is great really. it was fun working with david showing . >> it's been very fulfilling this whole experience. >> while bowie will forever be remembered as the pioneer who blurred the line between music and theater. his genius transcended on
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>> i have this thing about freaks and ace ionists and freak >> it's a different role more than just music. >> six years later, his most memorable role came as the goblin king in "labyrinth." >> i have been jealous up until now. >> bowie was so sweet to me. he a nice, sweet guy, cracking jo friendly with the kroo. >> starring opposite a then unknown jennifer connelly, her life was forever changed by that experience. saying, i have never met
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tomorrow on "the insider."
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grammys. >> we have the grammys to go, everything you didn't see tv, with the the fashion and the mess inside. and the winners inspire up comers, we look back on their award winning past. and inside michael yo's valentine's day i dos. that's tomorrow on "the insider." . before wego, here's what we're working on tomorrow. we have the grammys to go. everything you didn't see on tv.
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fashion and the most inside. the music coaches go to the grammys, as t inspire up and
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>> i have never, ever met a person that lies more than ted cruz. >> reporter: if nothing else, president bush drew the biggest crowd jeb has seen on the campaign trail. elsewhere, trump threatened to sue cruz over his eligibility to run for the white house and hint -- once again hinted he may run as independent if he doesn't secure the republican nomination. >> major garrett. thanks. the next president will have syria to deal with. today in syria two schools and five hospitals were flattened by air strikes. most likely russian. the u.n. says nearly 50 people were killed. holly williams is following this. >> reporter: today a suspected
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hospital in the province. these videos appear to show the desperate search for survivors in its twisted ruins. at least seven people are thought to have died. more alleged russian air strikes reportedly hit a school and a hospital in the town of azaz. a former rebel stronghold. injured children were ferried across the border for treatment in turkey. despite the temporary cease-fire agreement -- russia says it will continue its strikes which give cover to the forces of syrian president bashar al-assad. on the ground in syria it is not clear whether anyone will stop fighting. an officer with a rebel group that has received weapons from th
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he told us they won't comply with the temporary truce, even if it means losing american support. hundreds of thousands of people, have died, the regime has the the backing of russian air strikes now, of iran, you're losing territory. wouldn't it be better to sit down with the regime of al assad? >> we started this revolution to get rid of him here, told us. mr. obama said that bashar al assad lost his legitimacy. how could we ignore that and sit down with a terrorist? syria claimed today that the hospital attack in the region was carried out by the u.s.-led coalition. the u.s. said its planes weren't even in the area. but scott that is an indication of how difficult it can be to negotiate with the syrian regime. >> holly williams on the turkey-syrian border for us tonight. holly, thank you. today, pope francis visited one of mexico's poorest states. at a mass in chiapas on the
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denounced the abuse of mexico's indigenous people. the area is the center of a migration crisis as central americans struggle to reach the u.s. manuel bojorquez takes us there. >> reporter: the men walking for days part of their desperate journey north. we have to keep going says this man, because the situation in el salvador is very dangerous. violence and poverty have forced thousands to flee. >> to get north gives you hope of a better life. but it has become a dangerous gamble. 900 to 1,000 new arrivals. emily vickland runs the only migrant shelter in this corner of mexico. >> a lot of people get robbed, raped, kidnapped, abused in some
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aware of it being this bad. >> vickland says it is a result of mexico's crackdown on its southern border. a multimillion dollar program, partially funded by the united states. but it hasn't stopped the migrant, last year housing more than 11,000. >> used to be the migrant house where people used to stay a few days and they would move on. we are now more like a refugee camp. >> 16-year-old kevin flores says gangs threat tuned kill him. he showed us where he crossed into mexico. >> how long did that take? [ speaking spanish ] >> three days walking. he wants to get to new york to beep with his sisters. his fastest option is also the most dangerous. jumping on a northbound train. some die on the train, he says, others are thrown off, robbed, or beaten. raids like this are common as part of the government crackdown. and train companies have hired
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this cell phone video shows the moment one guard on the approaching train here shot and killed a migrant. despite the dangers migrants still make any run they can for the midnight train. on this night, 20 from the shelter tried. but only two made it. the next morning, others were still waiting. willing to risk everything. mexico says its goal is to stop human smuggling, but scott a human rights group argues mexico and the u.s. are deporting migrants who are refugees. and at least 90 were recently killed after they were sent back home. >> remarkable report, manuel bojorquez. thank you. a big storm is making a mess from the south to the northeast. and, smoke forces a jetliner into an emergency landing. the cbs overnight news will be
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a severe storm apparently triggered tornados in louisiana
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and it made a mess all the way to maine. here is jericka duncan. >> when the snow started to fall overnight in piedmont, north carolina, commuters began to crash. throughout the state, police reported hundreds of accidents due to weather. that same storm also helped spawn a number of tornados across the gulf states. the latest system comes one day after an historic cold snap on valentine's day at least 20 cities in the u.s. set or tied records for lowest temperature. and watertown new york, it was minus 37 degrees. the subfreezing temperatures complicated efforts to fight this fire in suburban philadelphia. it took 150 firefighters six hours to put out the flames and
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an icebox. at cannon mountain in new hampshire, emergency responders, braved the bitter cold for nearly two hours as they rescued 48 people stuck in two tram cars, 40 feet above ground. a family doing some sight seeing with the baby was part of the group waiting for help. right now, snow is turning into freezing rain. it is about 30 degrees here in new york city. tomorrow, temperatures are expected to reach 55. but, scott that went be a record. that was set back in 1954, when it was 71 degrees. >> jericka duncan in the cold for us tonight. thank you very much. >> president lincoln gets a
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today an alaskan airlines jet had just left washington's reagan national airport when smoke filled the cockpit. kris van cleave on what happened next.
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>> we have smoke in the cockpit. we need directors immediately to dulles. >> reporter: a boeing 737 like this one with 161 passengers and six crew bound for seattle. it turned into a tense 16 minute flight to the nearby dulles airport. >> basically we don't know where the source of the smoke came from. it did not come in the cabin. we got verification. >> reporter: pilots asked for fire crews to meet them on the runway. >> emergency aircraft. we are going to need the trucks, please. >> they should be coming out. >> wear's 're cleared to land. [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: a passenger told cbs news she noticed a burning smell right after takeoff. the airline is still looking for
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scott, both pilots have to be checked out by doctors. >> no one seriously injured. kris, thank you. at 94, the lincoln memorial is beginning to look its age. today, billionaire, david rubenstein is donating $18.5 million to fix broken bricks,
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hi, welcome to the overnight news. i'm demarco morgan. the death of antonin scalia set off a political firestorm over a possible successor. but scalia's death itself is also a matter of controversy. the 79-year-old jurist was found dead in this bed inside a luxury suite in a hunting resort in texas. declared dead over the phone by a local judge who determined after talking to local police that scalia died of natural causes.
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towards ordering an autopsy but after talking on the phone to scalia's personal doctor, she determined none would be necessary. the body is being returned to washington. meantime, the political fight over replacing scalia is intensifying. here is nancy cordes. >> reporter: supreme court confirmations are high drama during the best of times. this is not the best of times, a democrat president trying to replace a conservative icon in an election year. though he has got nearly a year left in his term, republicans argue his time is up. - i do not believe the president should appoint someone. >> called delay, delay, delay. [ applause ] >> reporter: the two sides took their battle positions within hours of scalia's death. >> barack obama is president of the united states until january 20th, 2017. that is a fact, my friend. whether the republicans like it
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>> reporter: the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president. and mcconnell controls who gets a vote and when. >> nobody can be surprised by how i feel. >> reporter: south carolina republican lindsay graam and many others got behind him. >> not hedging your bets hoping there is a republican who comes into office next january who would appoint the new nominee? >> i am hoping they will. i am saying the next president should make the pick. >> reporter: on the senate judiciary committee which considers supreme court nominees so does utah republican orrin hatch. >> this president is not going to appoint any body who isn't for left wing things that we think have been very dangerous for our country. >> top democrats called it obstructionism. >> you go right off the bat say i don't care who he nominates i am going to oppose him. >> these confirmations are normally a blood sport.
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apocalyptic. >> johnathan turley warned the showdown could end up scaring off potential nominees. >> the senate is unlikely to confirm you. you will have dozens of groups who will tear into you to make sure you are unconfirmable. the odds are most nominees could come out of the process damaged goods and likely not confirmed. >> reporter: he says if the president were replacing a liberal pick, they might let go out through. you are talking about a choice that could change the very balance of the supreme court. >> with a look at antonin scalia's life and legacy is jan crawford. >> people here at this court just cannot imagine what it is going to be like without him. known for sharp intellect, often sharp tongue, and his sudden death is going to leave this court split. 4 conservatives, 4 liberals.
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constitution in influenced a generation. >> i am law and order, social conservative. it does not affect my views on cases. >> reporter: a native of trenton, new jersey who grew up in queens, new york, scalia served on the supreme court nearly 30 years. the current court's longest serving justice. nominated by president reagan, scalia was also the first italian american justice. one month shy of his 80th birthday. scalia died while on a trip to this 30,000 acre ranch in texas, a judge declared scalia dead by phone. scalia's doctor said the justice suffered from a host of chronic conditions. his family declined to have an awe temperature see performed. on the nation's highest court, scalia was a larger than life figure and often dominated oral arguments with his sharp questions. >> if it is a question of individual rights and individual liberties that's what i am there for.
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cases before him. >> if you were a lawyer arguing in front of him. and he thought your argument was hogwash, he would tell you it was hogwash. despite his staunch, conservative views, scalia had deep friendships with liberal justices, ruth bader ginsburg who shared affinity for opera. in a statement, ginsburg said they were best buddies. and called him a jurist of captivating brilliance and wit with a rare talent to make even the most sober judge laugh. >> i can be charming and combative at the same time. what's -- what's contradictory between the two. i love to argue. i have always loved to argue. quarterback peyton manning captured the second super bowl championship this season but now find himself battling sex abuse allegations dating back 20 years. the charges stem from his time as a star quarterback for the university of tennessee. dana jacobson has the story.
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manning captured the second super bowl victory last week. impressive feat which many believe could be the end of a hall of fame career. but it is what he is accused of doing 20 years ago as a 19-year-old that has everyone talking today. six former students filed a federal lawsuit against the university of ten seep last week according to the tennessean newspaper claiming the athletic department has long condoned a hostile sexual environment. the lawsuit filed under title 9 references one allegation involving peyton manning during his time as a star quarterback at tennessee. this weekend, "the new york daily news" reported on legal documents they obtained. originally from 2003, which detail an incident in 1996, when manning was a sophomore at tennessee. athletic trainer, jamie nawwright was evaluating the 19-year-old quarterback when manning allegedly placed his exposed genitals on her head. manning denied the trainer's claims saying he was mooning an athlete in the room. she sued the university and
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which reportedly included a mutual nondisclosure agreement with manning. she also resigned from her job at the university. >> the indianapolis colts select quarterback, peyton manning. manning the first pick in the 1998 nfl draft. two years later the quarterback co-auhored a book with his father, archie manning in which he described the 1996 mooning incident as crude maybe but harmless. described the female trainer as having a vulgar mouth. nawwright sued again and settled again out of court in 2003. the documents that surfaced over the weekend were originally filed in 2003 as part of the lawsuit against peyton, archie, their book publisher, and ghost writer. according to the daily news the court documents were never widely released. although "usa today" reported on their contents. despite the 39-year-old super bowl win last weekend his clean image under the microscope.
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from al-jazeera america in which he is accused of involvement with human growth hormone. >> i understand when allegation is made that the nfl has no choice to investigate it. i get that. but i can tell you what they're going to find. a big fat nothing. >> the cbs "overnight news" will
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cia director john brennan is raising eyebrows over his comment that the islamic state has obtained chemical munitions and is threatening a cyberattack on the united states. brennan described his fears to scott pelley for "60 minutes." is isis coming here? >> i think isil does eventually want to find its mark here. >> you are expecting an attack in the united states? >> i'm expecting them to try to put in place the operatives,
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need to do to incite people to carry out these attacks. clearly. i believe their attempts are inevitable. i don't think their successes are. >> can you explain why these people want to kill us? how does attacking the united states further their interests? >> i think they're trying to provoke a clash between the west and the muslim world or the world that they're in. as a way to gain more adherence. what they're claiming is that, the united states is trying to take over their countries which is the furtherest from the truth. >> paris was a failure of intelligence. all but one of the eight terrorists were french citizens. trained by isis in syria. they returned unnoticed and attacked six locations killing 130 people. what did you learn from paris? >> that there is a lot that isil probably has under way that we
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insight into. we knew the system was blinking red. we knew in the days before that isil was trying to carry out something. but the individuals involved have been able to take advantage the newly available means of communication that are -- that are walled off from law enforcement officials. >> you're talking encrypted internet communication? >> yeah, sophisticated use of technologies and communication systems. >> after paris you told your people what? >> we have got to work harder. we have to work harder. we need to have the capabilities, technical capabilities, human resources, need to have advanced notice about this so we can take the steps to stop them. >> believe me, intelligence security services have stopped numerous attacks, operatives that have been moved from -- from maybe the iraq syria theater into europe, stopped, interdicted, arrested. detained, debriefed. >> the failure in paris allowed yes to attack with bombs and assault rifles. brennan told us there is more in
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does isis have chemical weapons? >> we have a number of instances where isis has used chemical munitions on the battlefield. >> artillery shells? >> sure, yeah. >> isis has access to chemical artillery shells? >> chemical precursor ammunitions they can use. >> the cia believes isis has ability to manufacture small quantities of chlorine and mustard gas. and the capability of exporting the chemicals to the west? >> there is always a potential to that. it is important to cut off various transportation and smuggling routes they used. >> are there american assets on the ground hunting this down?
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actively involved in bng a shooting war that worries brennan most. his cia is facing a new front in
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and a focus on it, he set up the agency's first new directorate in more than 50 years. that cyberenvironment can pose a very, very serious and significant attack vector for our adversaries if they want to take down our infrastructure. if they want to create havoc in transportation system thousands. if they want to do -- great damage to our financial networks. there are safe guard put in place. but that cyberenvironment is one that really is the thing that keeps me up at night. >> you can see more of scott pelley's report on our website. cbs news.com. the overnight news will be right back. i think we should've taken a left at the river. tarzan know where tarzan go! tarzan does not know where tarzan go. hey, excuse me, do you know where the waterfall is? waterfall? no, me tarzan, king of jungle. why don't you want to just ask somebody? if you're a couple, you fight over directions. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. oh ohhhhh it's what you do. ohhhhhh! do you have to do thattright in my ear? living well your immune system works hard to keep you
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by eating healthy, drinking fluids, and getting some rest. and you can combine these simple remedies with airborne. no other leading immunity brand gives you more vitamin c. plus it has a specially crafted blend of 13 vitamins, minerals and herbs. so when you want to support your immune system, take airborne, and enjoy living well. (sounds of birds whistling) music introducing new k-y touch gel cr
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for massage and intimacy. every touch, gently intensified. a little touch is all it takes.
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lanes weren't even in the area. but scott that is an indication of how difficult it can be to negotiate with the syrian regime. >> holly williams on the turkey-syrian border for us tonight. holly, thank you. today, pope francis, visit itted one of mexico's poorest states.
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border of guatemala, francis denounced the abuse of mexico's indigenous people. the area is the center of a migration crisis as central americans struggle to reach the u.s. manuel bojorquez takes us there. >> reporter: the men walking for days part of their desperate journey north. we have to keep going says this man, because the situation in el salvador is very dangerous. violence and poverty have forced thousands to flee. >> to get north gives you hope of a better life. but it has become a dangerous gamble.
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